American Indians

Imprisoned Art, Complex Patronage

Plains Drawings by Howling Wolf and Zotom at the Autry National Center
By Joyce M. Szabo

The study of what has become known as Plains Indian ledger art and of Fort Marion drawings in particular, has burgeoned in the last forty years. Joyce Szabo’s examination of the two drawing books by Zotom and Howling Wolf encompasses their origins and the issues surrounding their commission as well as what the images say about their creators and their collector.

Navajos Wear Nikes

A Reservation Life
By Jim Kristofic

With tales of gangs and skinwalkers, an Indian Boy Scout troop, a fanatical Sunday school teacher, and the author’s own experience of sincere friendships that lead to hózhó (beautiful harmony), Kristofic’s memoir is an honest portrait of growing up on—and growing to love—the Reservation.

The Blackfoot Confederacy 1880-1920

A Comparative Study of Canadian and U.S. Indian Policy
By Hana Samek

This extensive, detailed history of Indian life on American reservations and Canadian reserves will be of interest to all who have a serious interest in Anglo-American and Indian affairs.

The Art of Americanization at the Carlisle Indian School

By Hayes Mauro

In this historical study, Mauro analyzes the visual imagery produced at the Carlisle Indian Industrial School as a specific instance of the aesthetics of Americanization at work. His work combines a consideration of cultural contexts and themes specific to the United States of the time and critical theory to flesh out innovative historical readings of the photographic materials.

Becoming Indian

The Struggle over Cherokee Identity in the Twenty-first Century
By Circe Sturm

In Becoming Indian, author Circe Sturm examines Cherokee identity politics and the phenomenon of racial shifting. Racial shifters, as described by Sturm, are people who have changed their racial self-identification from non-Indian to Indian on the US Census.

The Way of Thorn and Thunder

The Kynship Chronicles
By Daniel Justice

Available for the first time in one volume, Daniel Heath Justice's acclaimed Thorn and Thunder novels take Indigenous fantasy fiction beyond its stereotypes and tell a story set in a world similar to eighteenth-century eastern North America. The original trilogy-an example of green/eco-literature-is collected here in a one-volume novel.

Gerald Vizenor

Texts and Contexts
By Deborah L. MadsenA. Robert Lee

This essay collection offers an overview of Vizenor scholarship through close reading of his texts and exploration of the intellectual contexts in which they are situated.

Constructing Lives at Mission San Francisco

Native Californians and Hispanic Colonists, 1776-1821
By Quincy Newell

In this finely crafted study Quincy Newell examines the complexity of cultural contact between Franciscans and the native populations at Mission San Francisco.

The Sacred Oral Tradition of the Havasupai

As Retold By Elders and Headmen Manakaja and Sinyella 1918–1921
Edited by Frank TikalskyCatherine EulerJohn Nagel

This collection of forty-eight stories is one of the earliest, most complete translations of an entire Native American oral tradition.

The Lipan Apaches

People of Wind and Lightning
By Thomas A. Britten

This study of one of the least-known Apache tribes utilizes archival materials to reconstruct Lipan history through numerous threats to their society.

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