American Indians

The Art of Americanization at the Carlisle Indian School

By Hayes Mauro

In this historical study, Mauro analyzes the visual imagery produced at the Carlisle Indian Industrial School as a specific instance of the aesthetics of Americanization at work. His work combines a consideration of cultural contexts and themes specific to the United States of the time and critical theory to flesh out innovative historical readings of the photographic materials.

Gerald Vizenor

Texts and Contexts
By Deborah L. MadsenA. Robert Lee

This essay collection offers an overview of Vizenor scholarship through close reading of his texts and exploration of the intellectual contexts in which they are situated.

Becoming Indian

The Struggle over Cherokee Identity in the Twenty-first Century
By Circe Sturm

In Becoming Indian, author Circe Sturm examines Cherokee identity politics and the phenomenon of racial shifting. Racial shifters, as described by Sturm, are people who have changed their racial self-identification from non-Indian to Indian on the US Census.

The Way of Thorn and Thunder

The Kynship Chronicles
By Daniel Justice

Available for the first time in one volume, Daniel Heath Justice's acclaimed Thorn and Thunder novels take Indigenous fantasy fiction beyond its stereotypes and tell a story set in a world similar to eighteenth-century eastern North America. The original trilogy-an example of green/eco-literature-is collected here in a one-volume novel.

Constructing Lives at Mission San Francisco

Native Californians and Hispanic Colonists, 1776-1821
By Quincy Newell

In this finely crafted study Quincy Newell examines the complexity of cultural contact between Franciscans and the native populations at Mission San Francisco.

The Sacred Oral Tradition of the Havasupai

As Retold By Elders and Headmen Manakaja and Sinyella 1918–1921
Edited by Frank TikalskyCatherine EulerJohn Nagel

This collection of forty-eight stories is one of the earliest, most complete translations of an entire Native American oral tradition.

Pueblo Peoples on the Pajarito Plateau

Archaeology and Efficiency
By David E. Stuart

Stuart demonstrates how the descendants of the Chaco survivors who relocated to Bandlier and the Pajarito Plateau rebalanced their society to be more efficient and practical in order to survive.

The Lipan Apaches

People of Wind and Lightning
By Thomas A. Britten

This study of one of the least-known Apache tribes utilizes archival materials to reconstruct Lipan history through numerous threats to their society.

Indians and Energy

Exploitation and Opportunity in the American Southwest
Edited by Sherry L. SmithBrian Frehner

The authors consider the complex relationship between development and Indian communities in the Southwest in order to reveal how an understanding of patterns in the past can guide policies and decisions in the future.

The Work of Sovereignty

Tribal Labor Relations and Self-Determination at the Navajo Nation
By David Kamper

The Work of Sovereignty is a study of organizing campaigns and grassroots, ad hoc collective political actions carried out by employees trying to increase control over their workplaces and their say in the political life of their communities in Indian Country. By studying them, the author takes an on-the-ground approach to tribal labor relations that puts tribal workers at the center of the action. Attending to indigenous peoples as both economic and political members of their community in this way also sheds light on processes of indigenous self-determination that are not always as readily visible as those in courtrooms and tribal council chambers.

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