American Indians

Our Lives

Collaboration, Native Voice, and the Making of the National Museum of the American Indian
By Jennifer A. Shannon

In 2004 the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) opened to the general public. This book, in the broadest sense, is about how that museum became what it is today. For many Native individuals, the NMAI, a prominent and permanent symbol of Native presence in America, in the shadow of the Capitol and at the center of federal power, is a triumph.

Subjects: American Indians

Imagining Geronimo

An Apache Icon in Popular Culture
By William M. Clements

Clements’s study examines Americans’ changing sense of Geronimo and looks at the ways Geronimo tried to maintain control of his own image during more than twenty years in which he was a prisoner of war.

A Prehistory of Western North America

The Impact of Uto-Aztecan Languages
By David Leedom Shaul

This book offers a new approach to the use of linguistic data to reconstruct prehistory. The author shows how a well-studied language family—in this case Uto-Aztecan—can be used as an instrument for reconstructing prehistory.

Indian Subjects

Hemispheric Perspectives on the History of Indigenous Education
Edited by Brenda J. ChildBrian Klopotek

Indian Subjects brings together an outstanding group of scholars from the fields of anthropology, history, law, education, literature, and Native studies to address indigenous education throughout different regions and eras.

Indian Policies in the Americas

from Columbus to Collier and Beyond
By William Y. Adams

In Indian Policies in the Americas, Adams addresses the idea that “the Indian,” as conceived by colonial powers and later by different postcolonial interest groups, was as much ideology as empirical reality. Adams surveys the policies of the various colonial and postcolonial powers, then reflects upon the great ideological, moral, and intellectual issues that underlay those policies.

The Shoshoneans

The People of the Basin-Plateau
Expanded Edition
By Edward DornLeroy Lucas
Edited by Matthew Hofer

First published almost fifty years ago and long out of print, The Shoshoneans is a classic American travelogue about the Great Basin and Plateau region and the people who inhabit it, never before—or since—documented in such striking and memorable fashion.

Jaune Quick-to-See Smith

An American Modernist
By Carolyn Kastner

The first full-length critical analysis of the paintings of Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, this book focuses on Smith’s role as a modernist in addition to her status as a wellknown Native American artist. With close readings of Smith’s work, Carolyn Kastner shows how Smith simultaneously contributes to and critiques American art and its history.

Going Native

By Tom Harmer

In a spiritual autobiography shaped by years of living with a band of Salish Indian people after the Vietnam War, Tom Harmer shares his hard-won knowledge of their world and the nature spirits that govern it.

Again the Far Morning

New and Selected Poems
By N. Scott Momaday

This first book of Momaday's poems to be published in over a decade, Again the Far Morning comprises a varied selection of new work along with the best from his four earlier books of poems.

Sandals of the Basketmaker and Pueblo Peoples

Fabric Structure and Color Symmetry
By Lynn Shuler TeagueDorothy K. Washburn

The decorated sandals worn by prehistoric southwesterners with their complex fiber structures and designs have been dissected, described, and interpreted for a century. Nevertheless, these artifacts remain mysterious in many respects. Teague and Washburn examine these sandals as sources of information on the history of the people known as the Basketmakers.

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