American Indians

Native Women and Land

Narratives of Dispossession and Resurgence
By Stephanie J. Fitzgerald

“What roles do literary and community texts and social media play in the memory, politics, and lived experience of those dispossessed?” Fitzgerald asks this question in her introduction and sets out to answer it in her study of literature and social media by (primarily) Native women who are writing about and often actively protesting against displacement caused both by forced relocation and environmental disaster.

Tiller’s Guide to Indian Country

Economic Profiles of American Indian Reservations
Third Edition
Edited by Veronica E. Velarde Tiller

This reference edition profiles each tribe’s history and culture, with detailed information about their communities, natural resources, enterprises, and environmental concerns, as well as their contact information.

Subjects: American Indians

Advocates for the Oppressed

Hispanos, Indians, Genízaros, and Their Land in New Mexico
By Malcolm Ebright

Having written about Hispano land grants and Pueblo Indian grants separately, Malcolm Ebright now brings these narratives together for the first time, reconnecting them and resurrecting lost histories.

The Women's National Indian Association

A History
Edited by Valerie Sherer Mathes

Mathes’s edited volume, the first book to address the history of the WNIA, comprises essays by eight authors on the work of this important reform group.

Fixing the Books

Secrecy, Literacy, and Perfectibility in Indigenous New Mexico
By Erin Debenport

In Fixing the Books, professor Erin Debenport (anthropology, University of New Mexico) presents the research she conducted on an indigenous language literacy effort within a New Mexico Pueblo community, and the potential of that literacy to compromise Pueblo secrecy.

Four Square Leagues

Pueblo Indian Land in New Mexico
By Malcolm EbrightRick HendricksRichard W. Hughes

This long-awaited book is the most detailed and up-to-date account of the complex history of Pueblo Indian land in New Mexico, beginning in the late seventeenth century and continuing to the present day.

Laguna Pueblo

A Photographic History
By Lee MarmonTom Corbett

Laguna Pueblo: A Photographic History includes more than one hundred of Marmon’s photos showcasing his talents while highlighting the cohesive, adaptive, and independent character of the Laguna people.

The Zunis

Self-Portrayals
Translated by Alvina Quam

Now back in print after more than thirty years, The Zunis: Self-Portrayals offers forty-six stories of myth, prophecy, and history from the great oral literature of the Zuni Indians of New Mexico.

The Hero Twins

A Navajo-English Story of the Monster Slayers
By Jim Kristofic
Illustrations by Nolan Karras James

Told in Navajo, the Diné language, and English, this story exists in many versions, and all demonstrate the importance of thinking, patience, persistence, bravery, and reverence.

Living the Ancient Southwest

Edited by David Grant Noble

How did Southwestern peoples make a living in the vast arid reaches of the Great Basin? When and why did violence erupt in the Mesa Verde region? Who were the Fremont people? How do some Hopis view Chaco Canyon? These are just a few of the topics addressed in Living the Ancient Southwest.

Pages