Latin America

Contested Nation

The Mapuche, Bandits, and State Formation in Nineteenth-Century Chile
By Pilar M. Herr

Contested Nation argues that with Chilean independence, Araucanía—because of its status as a separate nation-state—became essential to the territorial integrity of the new Chilean Republic.

Victory on Earth or in Heaven

Mexico's Religionero Rebellion
By Brian A. Stauffer

This work reconstructs the history of Mexico’s forgotten “Religionero” rebellion of 1873–1877, an armed Catholic challenge to the government of Sebastián Lerdo de Tejada.

A Woman, a Man, a Nation

Mariquita Sánchez, Juan Manuel de Rosas, and the Beginnings of Argentina
By Jeffrey M. Shumway

Mariquita’s and Juan Manuel’s lives corresponded with the major events and processes that shaped the turbulent beginnings of the Argentine nation, many of which also shaped Latin America and the Atlantic World during the Age of Revolution (1750–1850).

Breath and Smoke

Tobacco Use among the Maya
Edited by Jennifer A. Loughmiller-CardinalKeith Eppich

Breath and Smoke explores the uses of tobacco among the Maya of Central America, revealing tobacco as a key topic in pre-Columbian art, iconography, and hieroglyphics.

Living in Silverado

Secret Jews in the Silver Mining Towns of Colonial Mexico
By David M. Gitlitz

In this thoroughly researched work, David M. Gitlitz traces the lives and fortunes of three clusters of sixteenth-century crypto-Jews in Mexico’s silver mining towns.

La Santa Muerte in Mexico

History, Devotion, and Society
Edited by Wil G. Pansters

This book examines La Santa Muerte’s role in people’s daily lives and explores how popular religious practices of worship and devotion developed around a figure often associated with illicit activities.

The Legacy of Rulership in Fernando de Alva Ixtlilxochitl’s Historia de la nación chichimeca

By Leisa A. Kauffmann

In this book Leisa A. Kauffmann takes an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the writings of one of Mexico’s early chroniclers, Fernando de Alva Ixtilxochitl, a bilingual seventeenth-century historian from Central Mexico.

The Origins of Macho

Men and Masculinity in Colonial Mexico
By Sonya Lipsett-Rivera

Lipsett-Rivera traces the genesis of the Mexican macho by looking at daily interactions between Mexican men in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

Protestantism and State Formation in Postrevolutionary Oaxaca

By Kathleen M. McIntyre

In this fascinating book Kathleen M. McIntyre traces intra-village conflicts stemming from Protestant conversion in southern Mexico and successfully demonstrates that both Protestants and Catholics deployed cultural identity as self-defense in clashes over local power and authority.

Mexico in the Time of Cholera

By Donald Fithian Stevens

The book takes the devastating 1833 cholera epidemic as its dramatic center and expands beyond this episode to explore love, lust, lies, and midwives.

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