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Jerónimo Antonio Gil and the Idea of the Spanish Enlightenment

By Kelly Donahue-Wallace

Details

Overview

Examining the career of a largely unstudied eighteenth-century engraver, this book establishes Jerónimo Antonio Gil, a man immersed within the complicated culture and politics of the Spanish empire, as a major figure in the history of both Spanish and Mexican art. Donahue-Wallace examines Gil as an artist, tracing his education, entry into professional life, appointment to the Mexico City mint, and foundation of the Royal Academy of the Three Noble Arts of San Carlos. She analyzes the archival and visual materials he left behind and, most importantly, she considers the ideas, philosophies, and principles of his era, those who espoused them, and how Gil responded to them. Although frustrated by resistance from the faculty and colleagues he brought to his academy, Gil would leave a lasting influence on the Mexican art scene as local artists continued to benefit from his legacy at the Mexican academy.

Contributor Bios
Kelly Donahue-Wallace is professor of art history at the University of North Texas. She is the author Art and Architecture of Viceregal Latin America, 1521–1821 (UNM Press).